Behavior therapy for tics in children: acute and long-term effects on psychiatric and psychosocial functioning.

TitleBehavior therapy for tics in children: acute and long-term effects on psychiatric and psychosocial functioning.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsWoods, DW, Piacentini JC, Scahill L, Peterson AL, Wilhelm S, Chang S, Deckersbach T, McGuire J, Specht M, Conelea CA, Rozenman M, Dzuria J, Liu H, Levi-Pearl S, Walkup JT
JournalJournal of child neurology
Volume26
Issue7
Pagination858-65
Date Published2011 Jul
ISSN1708-8283
KeywordsAdolescent, Behavior Therapy, Child, Female, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders, Psychology, Social Behavior Disorders, Tic Disorders, Time, Tourette Syndrome, Treatment Outcome
Abstract

Children (n = 126) ages 9 to 17 years with chronic tic or Tourette disorder were randomly assigned to receive either behavior therapy or a control treatment over 10 weeks. This study examined acute effects of behavior therapy on secondary psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning and long-term effects on these measures for behavior therapy responders only. Baseline and end point assessments conducted by a masked independent evaluator assessed several secondary psychiatric symptoms and measures of psychosocial functioning. Responders to behavior therapy at the end of the acute phase were reassessed at 3-month and 6-month follow-up. Children in the behavior therapy and control conditions did not differentially improve on secondary psychiatric or psychosocial outcome measures at the end of the acute phase. At 6-month posttreatment, positive response to behavior therapy was associated with decreased anxiety, disruptive behavior, and family strain and improved social functioning. Behavior therapy is a tic-specific treatment for children with tic disorders.

DOI10.1002/hbm.21441
Alternate JournalJ. Child Neurol.