Depression, cognition, and self-appraisal of functional abilities in HIV: an examination of subjective appraisal versus objective performance.

TitleDepression, cognition, and self-appraisal of functional abilities in HIV: an examination of subjective appraisal versus objective performance.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsThames, AD, Becker BW, Marcotte TD, Hines LJ, Foley JM, Ramezani A, Singer EJ, Castellon SA, Heaton RK, Hinkin CH
JournalThe Clinical neuropsychologist
Volume25
Issue2
Pagination224-43
Date Published2011 Feb
ISSN1744-4144
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Adult, Cognition Disorders, Depression, Diagnostic Self Evaluation, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Language, Learning, Male, Medication Adherence, Mental Processes, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Psychomotor Performance
Abstract

Depression frequently co-occurs with HIV infection and can result in self-reported overestimates of cognitive deficits. Conversely, genuine cognitive dysfunction can lead to an under-appreciation of cognitive deficits. The degree to which depression and cognition influence self-report of capacity for instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) requires further investigation. This study examined the effects of depression and cognitive deficits on self-appraisal of functional competence among 107 HIV-infected adults. As hypothesized, higher levels of depression were found among those who over-reported problems in medication management, driving, and cognition when compared to those who under-reported or provided accurate self-assessments. In contrast, genuine cognitive dysfunction was predictive of under-reporting of functional deficits. Together, these results suggest that over-reliance on self-reported functional status poses risk for error when diagnoses require documentation of both cognitive impairment and associated functional disability in everyday life.

DOI10.1111/j.1460-9568.2012.08134.x
Alternate JournalClin Neuropsychol