Different forms of self-control share a neurocognitive substrate.

TitleDifferent forms of self-control share a neurocognitive substrate.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsTabibnia, G, Monterosso JR, Baicy K, Aron AR, Poldrack RA, Chakrapani S, Lee B, London ED
JournalThe Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Volume31
Issue13
Pagination4805-10
Date Published2011 Mar 30
ISSN1529-2401
KeywordsAdult, Amphetamine-Related Disorders, Behavior, Addictive, Brain, cognition, Female, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Inhibition (Psychology), Male, Methamphetamine, Neuropsychological Tests, Photic Stimulation, Psychomotor Performance, Young Adult
Abstract

Psychological and neurocognitive studies have suggested that different kinds of self-control may share a common psychobiological component. If this is true, performance in affective and nonaffective inhibitory control tasks in the same individuals should be correlated and should rely upon integrity of this region. To test this hypothesis, we acquired high-resolution magnetic resonance images from 44 healthy and 43 methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Individuals with methamphetamine dependence were tested because of prior findings that they suffer inhibitory control deficits. Gray matter structure of the inferior frontal gyrus was assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Subjects participated in tests of motor and affective inhibitory control (stop-signal task and emotion reappraisal task, respectively); and methamphetamine-dependent subjects provided self-reports of their craving for methamphetamine. Performance levels on the two inhibitory control tasks were correlated with one another and with gray matter intensity in the right pars opercularis region of the inferior frontal gyrus in healthy subjects. Gray matter intensity of this region was also correlated with methamphetamine craving. Compared with healthy subjects, methamphetamine-dependent subjects exhibited lower gray matter intensity in this region, worse motor inhibitory control, and less success in affect regulation. These findings suggest that self-control in different psychological domains involves a common substrate in the right pars opercularis, and that successful self-control depends on integrity of this substrate.

DOI10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.51
Alternate JournalJ. Neurosci.