High-frequency oscillations recorded in human medial temporal lobe during sleep.

TitleHigh-frequency oscillations recorded in human medial temporal lobe during sleep.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsStaba, RJ, Wilson CL, Bragin A, Jhung D, Fried I, Engel J
JournalAnnals of neurology
Volume56
Issue1
Pagination108-15
Date Published2004 Jul
ISSN0364-5134
KeywordsAnimals, Electrodes, Implanted, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Functional Laterality, High-Frequency Ventilation, Hippocampus, Humans, sleep, Temporal Lobe, Wakefulness
Abstract

The presence of fast ripple oscillations (FRs, 200-500 Hz) has been confirmed in rodent epilepsy models but has not been observed in nonepileptic rodents, suggesting that FRs are associated with epileptogenesis. Although studies in human epileptic patients have reported that both FRs and ripples (80-200 Hz) chiefly occur during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), and that ripple oscillations in human hippocampus resemble those found in nonprimate slow wave sleep, quantitative studies of these oscillations previously have not been conducted during polysomnographically defined sleep and waking states. Spontaneous FRs and ripples were detected using automated computer techniques in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy during sleep and waking, and results showed that the incidence of ripples, which are thought to represent normal activity in animal and human hippocampus, was similar between epileptogenic and nonepileptogenic temporal lobe, whereas rates of FR occurrence were significantly associated with epileptogenic areas. The generation of both FRs and ripples showed the highest rates of occurrence during NREM sleep. During REM sleep, ripple rates were lowest, whereas FR rates remained elevated and were equivalent to rates observed during waking. The predominance of FRs within the epileptogenic zone not only during NREM sleep, but also during epileptiform-suppressing desynchronized episodes of waking and REM sleep supports the view that FRs are the product of pathological neuronal hypersynchronization associated with seizure-generating areas.

DOI10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03065.x
Alternate JournalAnn. Neurol.