Predicting the longitudinal effects of the family environment on prodromal symptoms and functioning in patients at-risk for psychosis.

TitlePredicting the longitudinal effects of the family environment on prodromal symptoms and functioning in patients at-risk for psychosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsSchlosser, DA, Zinberg JL, Loewy RL, Casey-Cannon S, O'Brien MP, Bearden CE, Vinogradov S, Cannon TD
JournalSchizophrenia research
Volume118
Issue1-3
Pagination69-75
Date Published2010 May
ISSN1573-2509
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Family Relations, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Psychotic Disorders, Risk Factors, Social Perception, Young Adult
Abstract

The current study examined the relationship between the family environment and symptoms and functioning over time in a group of adolescents and young adults at clinical high risk for psychosis (N=63). The current study compared the ability of interview-based versus self-report ratings of the family environment to predict the severity of prodromal symptoms and functioning over time. The family environmental factors were measured by interviewer ratings of the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI), self-report questionnaires surveying the patient's perceptions of criticism and warmth, and parent reported perceptions of their own level of criticism and warmth. Patients living in a critical family environment, as measured by the CFI at baseline, exhibited significantly worse positive symptoms at a 6-month follow-up, relative to patients living in a low-key family environment. In terms of protective effects, warmth and an optimal level of family involvement interacted such that the two jointly predicted improved functioning at the 6-month follow-up. Overall, both interview-based and self-report ratings of the family environment were predictive of symptoms and functioning at follow-up; however patient's self-report ratings of criticism had stronger predictive power. These results suggest that the family environment should be a specific target of treatment for individuals at risk for psychosis.

DOI10.1002/hbm.20991
Alternate JournalSchizophr. Res.