De novo mutations revealed by whole-exome sequencing are strongly associated with autism.

TitleDe novo mutations revealed by whole-exome sequencing are strongly associated with autism.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSanders, SJ, Murtha MT, Gupta AR, Murdoch JD, Raubeson MJ, Willsey JA, Ercan-Sencicek GA, DiLullo NM, Parikshak NN, Stein JL, Walker MF, Ober GT, Teran NA, Song Y, El-Fishawy P, Murtha RC, Choi M, Overton JD, Bjornson RD, Carriero NJ, Meyer KA, Bilguvar K, Mane SM, Sestan N, Lifton RP, Günel M, Roeder K, Geschwind DH, Devlin B, State MW
JournalNature
Volume485
Issue7397
Pagination237-41
Date Published2012 May 10
ISSN1476-4687
KeywordsAlleles, Autistic Disorder, Codon, Nonsense, Exome, Exons, Genetic Heterogeneity, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Mutation, Nerve Tissue Proteins, RNA Splice Sites, Siblings, Sodium Channels
Abstract

Multiple studies have confirmed the contribution of rare de novo copy number variations to the risk for autism spectrum disorders. But whereas de novo single nucleotide variants have been identified in affected individuals, their contribution to risk has yet to be clarified. Specifically, the frequency and distribution of these mutations have not been well characterized in matched unaffected controls, and such data are vital to the interpretation of de novo coding mutations observed in probands. Here we show, using whole-exome sequencing of 928 individuals, including 200 phenotypically discordant sibling pairs, that highly disruptive (nonsense and splice-site) de novo mutations in brain-expressed genes are associated with autism spectrum disorders and carry large effects. On the basis of mutation rates in unaffected individuals, we demonstrate that multiple independent de novo single nucleotide variants in the same gene among unrelated probands reliably identifies risk alleles, providing a clear path forward for gene discovery. Among a total of 279 identified de novo coding mutations, there is a single instance in probands, and none in siblings, in which two independent nonsense variants disrupt the same gene, SCN2A (sodium channel, voltage-gated, type II, α subunit), a result that is highly unlikely by chance.

DOI10.1038/nn.3115
Alternate JournalNature