Concussive brain injury enhances fear learning and excitatory processes in the amygdala.

TitleConcussive brain injury enhances fear learning and excitatory processes in the amygdala.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsReger, ML, Poulos AM, Buen F, Giza CC, Hovda DA, Fanselow MS
JournalBiological psychiatry
Volume71
Issue4
Pagination335-43
Date Published2012 Feb 15
ISSN1873-2402
KeywordsAffective Symptoms, Amygdala, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Brain Concussion, Conditioning (Psychology), Fear, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Hippocampus, Humans, Isoenzymes, memory, Models, Animal, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Risk Factors, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Synaptic Transmission
Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injury (cerebral concussion) results in cognitive and emotional dysfunction. These injuries are a significant risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder. However, because physically traumatic events typically occur in a highly emotional context, it is unknown whether traumatic brain injury itself is a cause of augmented fear and anxiety.

DOI10.1002/hipo.20954
Alternate JournalBiol. Psychiatry