Prevention case management improves socioeconomic standing and reduces symptoms of psychological and emotional distress among transgender women.

TitlePrevention case management improves socioeconomic standing and reduces symptoms of psychological and emotional distress among transgender women.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsReback, CJ, Shoptaw S, Downing MJ
JournalAIDS care
Volume24
Issue9
Pagination1136-44
Date Published2012 Sep
ISSN1360-0451
Abstract

Abstract Urban transgender women often experience several sociocultural co-factors which contribute to their risk of HIV infection. A transgender-specific HIV Prevention Case Management (PCM) intervention was implemented in a community HIV prevention setting and targeted reducing sex work and homelessness, increasing legal employment and income, and reducing psychological and emotional distress symptoms. Sixty high-risk transgender women were enrolled in the ten-session PCM intervention. Participants completed approximately nine out of the ten sessions (M = 8.7; SD = 2.6) and six-month follow-up evaluations were completed with 97% of the participants. Findings from baseline to follow-up evaluations demonstrated a decrease in homelessness (31.0% vs. 10.3%, p<0.01), less reliance on exchange sex as a primary source of income (41.4% vs. 22.4%, p < 0.05), and significant decreases in symptom complaints across multiple Brief Symptom Inventory sub-scales, including depression, hostility, phobic anxiety, and psychoticism (all significant at p<0.05). Further, socioeconomic improvements following the intervention were significantly associated with psychological and emotional gains. The study suggests that adding a culturally appropriate PCM intervention in a community setting is beneficial in addressing co-factors for HIV infection as well as psychological and emotional distress symptoms among this extremely high-risk population.

DOI10.1111/j.1465-3362.2012.00423.x
Alternate JournalAIDS Care