Category-specific naming deficit identified by intraoperative stimulation mapping and postoperative neuropsychological testing. Case report.

TitleCategory-specific naming deficit identified by intraoperative stimulation mapping and postoperative neuropsychological testing. Case report.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsPouratian, N, Bookheimer SY, Rubino G, Martin NA, Toga AW
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume99
Issue1
Pagination170-6
Date Published2003 Jul
ISSN0022-3085
KeywordsAdult, Anomia, Brain, Brain Mapping, Electric Stimulation, Humans, Intraoperative Care, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, Postoperative Care, Preoperative Care, Severity of Illness Index
Abstract

Category-specific naming deficits and differential brain activation patterns have been reported in patients naming living as opposed to nonliving objects. The authors report on a case in which they used preoperative functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM), and postoperative neuropsychological testing to map language function. Using the latter two modalities, the authors identified a specific locus for category-specific naming in the posterior inferior temporal lobe, presumably a part of the basal temporal language area. Preoperative fMR imaging findings revealed the presence of a language area in the inferior temporal lobe; intraoperative ESM results indicated that this cortical area may be category specific for living objects; and after resection of the area, the results of postoperative neuropsychological testing confirmed that the patient made significantly more errors while naming living objects compared with nonliving ones (p < 0.001), independent of the effects of word frequency and with an intact system of object recognition and comprehension. These authors are the first to identify a specific and well-localized area of category-specific naming in the inferior temporal lobe and to demonstrate congruence of intraoperative and postoperative category-specific naming deficits. They also emphasize the roles of preoperative and intraoperative testing in predicting clinical outcomes.

Alternate JournalJ. Neurosurg.