Neural correlates of direct and reflected self-appraisals in adolescents and adults: when social perspective-taking informs self-perception.

TitleNeural correlates of direct and reflected self-appraisals in adolescents and adults: when social perspective-taking informs self-perception.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsPfeifer, JH, Masten CL, Borofsky LA, Dapretto M, Fuligni AJ, Lieberman MD
JournalChild development
Volume80
Issue4
Pagination1016-38
Date Published2009 Jul-Aug
ISSN1467-8624
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Child, Culture, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Net, Parietal Lobe, Prefrontal Cortex, Self Concept, Social Perception, Temporal Lobe, Young Adult
Abstract

Classic theories of self-development suggest people define themselves in part through internalized perceptions of other people's beliefs about them, known as reflected self-appraisals. This study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the neural correlates of direct and reflected self-appraisals in adolescence (N = 12, ages 11-14 years) and adulthood (N = 12, ages 23-30 years). During direct self-reflection, adolescents demonstrated greater activity than adults in networks relevant to self-perception (medial prefrontal and parietal cortices) and social-cognition (dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, temporal-parietal junction, and posterior superior temporal sulcus), suggesting adolescent self-construals may rely more heavily on others' perspectives about the self. Activity in the medial fronto-parietal network was also enhanced when adolescents took the perspective of someone more relevant to a given domain.

DOI10.1111/j.1751-7893.2009.00137.x
Alternate JournalChild Dev