Neuropathologic correlates of activities of daily living in Alzheimer disease.

TitleNeuropathologic correlates of activities of daily living in Alzheimer disease.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsMarshall, GA, Fairbanks LA, Tekin S, Vinters HV, Cummings JL
JournalAlzheimer disease and associated disorders
Volume20
Issue1
Pagination56-9
Date Published2006 Jan-Mar
ISSN0893-0341
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Basal Nucleus of Meynert, Brain, Brain Mapping, cerebral cortex, Female, Hippocampus, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neurofibrillary Tangles, Plaque, Amyloid, Retrospective Studies, Statistics as Topic
Abstract

Functional status, reflected by measures of activities of daily living (ADLs), deteriorates as Alzheimer disease (AD) progresses. Decline in activities of daily living may be mediated by executive and frontal lobe dysfunction. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between activities of daily living and pathologic burden in Alzheimer disease. Twenty two subjects with definite Alzheimer disease were selected from the UCLA ADRC neuropathology database. A total activities of daily living score was derived from the Retrospective Collateral Dementia Interview-Revised (RCDI-R) questionnaire, which was administered to caregivers of autopsied subjects included in the study. Neuritic plaque (NP) and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) counts were performed for 8 brain regions. There was a significant positive correlation between total activities of daily living score (higher scores indicate more disability) and mean neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangle counts (r = 0.671, P = 0.001, and r = 0.542, P = 0.009, resp), as well as CA1 and prosubiculum neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangle counts, right and left orbital frontal neuritic plaques counts, and occipital neuritic plaques count. Total activities of daily living score did not correlate with age at death, age at symptom onset, dementia duration, gender, or education. Deteriorating activities of daily living in Alzheimer Disease subjects correlate with greater overall pathologic burden and possibly selectively with involvement of the medial temporal, occipital, and orbital frontal regions.

DOI10.1002/hipo.20954
Alternate JournalAlzheimer Dis Assoc Disord