Use of clinical neurophysiology for the selection of medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder: the state of the evidence.

TitleUse of clinical neurophysiology for the selection of medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder: the state of the evidence.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsLeuchter, AF, Cook IA, Hunter A, Korb A
JournalClinical EEG and neuroscience : official journal of the EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ENCS)
Volume40
Issue2
Pagination78-83
Date Published2009 Apr
ISSN1550-0594
KeywordsAntidepressive Agents, Brain, Depressive Disorder, Major, Electroencephalography, Electrophysiological Phenomena, Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Humans, Tomography
Abstract

Approximately 50% of patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) respond to the first antidepressant medication prescribed, and fewer than one-third experience remission of symptoms. The most significant challenge in the management of MDD, therefore, is selection of the antidepressant medication that is most likely to lead to response or to remission for an individual patient. There is a growing body of evidence that certain clinical neurophysiologic techniques may be useful for selecting the medication that is most likely benefit each patient. Use of low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), loudness dependent auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP), and resting state quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) in the clinical setting is increasingly supported by studies indicating that these techniques may help identify particular medications that are most likely to lead to response or remission. The current state of evidence supporting the use of each technique is reviewed.

DOI10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01591.x
Alternate JournalClin EEG Neurosci