Evidence for deficient modulation of amygdala response by prefrontal cortex in bipolar mania.

TitleEvidence for deficient modulation of amygdala response by prefrontal cortex in bipolar mania.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsFoland, LC, Altshuler LL, Bookheimer SY, Eisenberger N, Townsend J, Thompson PM
JournalPsychiatry research
Volume162
Issue1
Pagination27-37
Date Published2008 Jan 15
ISSN0165-1781
KeywordsAdult, Affect, Amygdala, Bipolar disorder, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Net, Prefrontal Cortex, Reaction Time
Abstract

Several studies have implicated the involvement of two major components of emotion regulatory networks, the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and amygdala, in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. In healthy subjects, the VLPFC has been shown to negatively modulate amygdala response when subjects cognitively evaluate an emotional face by identifying and labeling the emotion it expresses. The current study used such a paradigm to assess whether the strength of this modulation was altered in bipolar subjects when manic. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), nine manic subjects with bipolar I disorder and nine healthy subjects either named the emotion shown in a face by identifying one of two words that correctly expressed the emotion (emotion labeling task) or matched the emotion shown in a face to one of two other faces (emotion perception task). The degree to which the VLPFC regulated amygdala response during these tasks was assessed using a psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis. Compared with healthy subjects, manic patients had a significantly reduced VLPFC regulation of amygdala response during the emotion labeling task. These findings, taken in context with previous fMRI studies of bipolar mania, suggest that reductions in inhibitory frontal activity in these patients may lead to an increased reactivity of the amygdala.

DOI10.1111/j.1399-5618.2012.01008.x
Alternate JournalPsychiatry Res