Interpersonal Style, Stress, and Depression: An Examination of Transactional and Diathesis-Stress Models.

TitleInterpersonal Style, Stress, and Depression: An Examination of Transactional and Diathesis-Stress Models.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsEberhart, NK, Hammen CL
JournalJournal of social and clinical psychology
Volume29
Issue1
Pagination23-38
Date Published2010 Jan 1
ISSN0736-7236
Abstract

The present study examines a transactional, interpersonal model of depression in which stress generation (Hammen, 1991) in romantic relationships mediates the association between aspects of interpersonal style (i.e., attachment, dependency, and reassurance seeking) and depressive symptoms. It also examines an alternative, diathesis-stress model in which interpersonal style interacts with romantic stressors in predicting depressive symptoms. These models were tested in a sample of college women, both prospectively over a four-week period, as well as on a day-today basis using a daily diary methodology. Overall, there was strong evidence for a transactional, mediation model in which interpersonal style predicted romantic conflict stress, and in turn depressive symptoms. The alternative diathesis-stress model of depression was not supported. These results are interpreted in relation to previous research, and key limitations that should be addressed by future research are discussed.

DOI10.1002/jts.20652
Alternate JournalJ Soc Clin Psychol