The cause of the imbalance in the neuronal network leading to seizure activity can be predicted by the electrographic pattern of the seizure onset.

TitleThe cause of the imbalance in the neuronal network leading to seizure activity can be predicted by the electrographic pattern of the seizure onset.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsBragin, A, Azizyan A, Almajano J, Engel J
JournalThe Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Volume29
Issue11
Pagination3660-71
Date Published2009 Mar 18
ISSN1529-2401
KeywordsAction Potentials, Animals, Electroencephalography, Nerve Net, Predictive Value of Tests, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Seizures, Time Factors
Abstract

This study investigates the temporal dynamics of ictal electrical activity induced by injection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, and the glutamate agonist kainic acid, into the CA3 area of hippocampus. Experiments were conducted in freely moving adult Wistar rats implanted with microelectrodes in multiple brain areas. Wide-band electrical activity (0.1-3000 Hz) was recorded, and the latency of seizure onset as well as the pattern of electrical activity were investigated for each drug. The latencies between injection and the occurrence of first epileptiform events were 3.93 +/- 2.76 (+/-STD) min for bicuculline and 6.37 +/- 7.66 min for kainic acid, suggesting the existence of powerful seizure-suppressive mechanisms in the brain. Bicuculline evoked high-amplitude rhythmic epileptiform events at the site of injection which resembled interictal EEG spikes and rapidly propagated to adjacent and remote brain areas. Kainic acid evoked a completely different pattern with a gradual increase in the amplitude of 30-80 Hz activity. Whereas there was strong temporal correlation between EEG events at the site of bicuculline injection and discharges in distant areas, much less correlation was seen with kainic acid injection. Both patterns were followed by generalized ictal EEG discharges and behavioral seizures. Our results illustrate that the same area of the brain can trigger seizures with different electrographic patterns. The knowledge of the network mechanisms underlying these two distinct electrographic patterns might be helpful in designing differential strategies for preventing seizure occurrence.

DOI10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03065.x
Alternate JournalJ. Neurosci.