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Fall 2013
Spring 2013 Newsletter
Spring 2013



UCLA LONGEVITY CENTER NEWS

 Dakim BrainFitness improves memory in older adults

Dr. Karen Miller, Ph.D., an associate clinical professor at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and Dr. Prabha Siddarth, Ph.D., a research statistician in psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute have found that older adults who regularly used a brain-fitness program on a computer demonstrated significantly improved memory and language skills.

Memory Fitness Exercises Help Seniors

Dr. Karen Miller, associate clinical professor at the Semel Institute and Dr. Linda Ercoli, director of geriatric psychology for the Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, were interviewed March 6 on BBC Radio about a memory-fitness program that has been shown to help seniors boost their verbal learning and retention skills, which may help lower their risk of dementia.

 

Judi Dench Takes Memory Supplements To Remember Lines

Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, and director of the UCLA Longevity Center. Commented March 20 on ABC News.com regarding ways to improve memory for a story about actress Judy Dench taking supplements to aid her memory. 

 

Elderly Mood Disorders

Dr. Helen Lavretsky, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the Late-Life Depression, Stress, and Wellness Research Program, was featured in an April 15 blog post on Elderbranch.com about late-life mood disorders.

Wireless Technology and the Brain

Dr. Gary Small, Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging, and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, was interviewed April 8 on New York's WOR 710AM about the potential social and neurological effects of wireless technology on children.

 

Alzheimer's disease takes its toll on families and caregivers

Linda Ercoli, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute, was quoted in the May 3 Pasadena Star-News about the psychological stress of being a caregiver for loved ones with Alzheimer's.

 

Healthy Lifestyle Makes Memories

Dr. Gary Small, the Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, was featured in a May 29 article from Examiner.com about a study he conducted with the Gallup organization showing that healthy eating, regular exercise and not smoking were related to better self-perceived memory abilities for most adult groups.

 

Quotables

Power of attorney: It’s easily abused

Dr. Gary Small, director of the UCLA Longevity Center was quoted March 19 in a MarketWatch.com article on elder financial abuse and determining decision-making capacity in older adults.

 

Brain Imaging IDs Cognitive Decline

On April 8 Scope Medicine published an article about researchers combining a brain-imaging tool and stroke test to detect early signs of dementia.Study authors Dr. David Merrill, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute, and Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, were quoted. 

 

UCLA LONGEVITY CENTER – PROGRAMS

 

Senior Scholars

Senior Scholars is a unique campus-wide program in which persons 50 years and older can audit courses at UCLA. We are now accepting application for summer quarter, if you would like to receive a summer catalog please email srscholars@mednet.ucla.edu or call 310-794-0679.

Summer session will begin June 24, 2013

 

Memory Care

MEMORY CARE is the UCLA Longevity Center’s weekly program for both caregivers and people experiencing memory loss (e.g., mild cognitive impairment, mild Alzheimer’s dementia). Memory Care teaches memory techniques as well as strategies to lower stress and stimulate the mind andbody. This program takes an innovative approach to memory loss by working directly with people who have memory challenges and those involved with their care. This group meets on Tuesdays from 1-4:15 PM. For more information about program fees and monthly membership, email AHoover@mednet.ucla.edu or call 310-794-6314.

 

Memory Training 

Memory Training teaches effective memory-enhancing techniques to people with mild memory concerns.  The course meets for four consecutive weeks, two hours each week.    Learn  the strategies and techniques through trainer presentations, group discussions, and skill-building exercises. Weekday, Saturday and evening classes are available.  For more information please contact Sherrie Goldfarb at (310) 794-0680 or email sgoldfarb@mednet.ucla.edu

 

Brain Boot Camp

Brain Boot Camp is designed for people with age-related memory concerns, who wish to improve or maintain their memory ability.  The course is not intended for people with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. 

Next upcoming Brain Boot Camp class:  June 11 from 9am-12pm for $300

After June 11th, Brain Boot Camp will be offered individually to participants at the rate of $100 per hour.

For more information, email bcamp@mednet.ucla.edu or call 310-794-6314

 

Research

Persons 50 to 90 needed for dietary supplement research. The study looks at the effects of Curcumin, the active ingredient of the Turmeric spice, on age-related cognitive impairment. For more information, please call 310-206-7392.

 

Persons 50 to 75 needed for pomegranate extract research. The study will assess the effect of pomegranate extract on cognitive abilities in older adults.  For more information, please call 310-206-1319.

 

Down syndrome adults 40 and older needed for study on Alzheimer’s disease. The study focuses on detecting early signs of Alzheimer’s disease in Down Syndrome.  For more information, please call 310-206-7392.

 

Adults 60 and older with established memory problems needed for brain imaging study. The study uses brain PET scans to improve early diagnosis of dementia. For more information call 310-206-7392.

 

Do you know someone with advance Alzheimer’s disease? UCLA researchers are looking to study persons withend-stage Alzheimer’s diseasein order to improve early diagnosis of dementia. For more information call 310-206-7392.

Latest news

UCLA program helps slow the mind’s aging, one exercise at a time

By Anna Gorman, Published: March 4 E-mail the writer Just as they had so many times during the past 60 years, Marianna and Albert Frankel stepped onto the dance floor. He took her hand in his and smiling, waltzed her around the room.
Doctor: Keeping the brain healthy is as important as exercising the body
As the body ages, so, too, does the brain, and to help avoid developing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of memory loss, the brain must be treated to mental and physical exercises, a healthy diet and visits to the doctor, when necessary. Dr. Gary Small, a medical doctor, professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, spoke to a crowd of mainly those over 60 during a Town Hall South lecture Tuesday in the auditorium of Upper St. Clair High School. When asked if audience members often forget names or objects like keys, almost every hand went up.
New brain-imaging techniques have provided insights into the biological underpinnings of psychiatric illnesses
Dr. Gary Small, UCLA's Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging and a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, was quoted Dec. 27 in a Psychiatric News article on how new brain-imaging techniques have provided insights into the biological underpinnings of psychiatric illnesses.
Adjusting financial planning to accommodate increased life expectancy.
Dr. Gary Small, UCLA's Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging and a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, was quoted Nov. 22 in a MarketWatch article about adjusting financial planning to accommodate increased life expectancy.
Reduce Stress with Yoga
A Nov. 22 Bloomberg article about the benefits of yoga for relieving stress cited a study led by Dr. Helen Lavretsky, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, showing that using yoga to engage in brief daily meditation can lead to improved cognitive functioning and lower levels of depression.