UCLA Longevity Center News Archive


Imaging technique IDs plaques, tangles in brains of severely depressed older adults

Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying biology of its development in older adults.      In a small study published in the November issue of the peer-reviewed journal Archives of General Psychiatry, UCLA researchers used a unique brain scan to assess the levels of amyloid plaques and tau tangles in older adults with a type of severe depression called major depressive disorder (MDD).    Previous research has suggested that plaque and tangle deposits in the brain — hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and many dementias — are associated not only with memory loss but also with mild symptoms of depression and anxiety in middle-aged and older individuals. The team wanted to... (8 Nov 11)

Imaging technique IDs plaques, tangles in brains of severely depressed older adults

Research by Longevity Center Director, Dr. Gary Small, and Plott Chair, Dr. Jorge Barrio, uses PET scans to examine link between depression and possible dementia in later life. (8 Nov 11) http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/imaging-technique-identifies-plaques-213580...

Techniques to help improve your memory

KABC-Channel 7 reported Sept. 21 on a study showing that a memory fitness program offered to older adults in their senior living communities improved their ability to recognize and recall words, enhancing their verbal learning and retention. Dr. Karen Miller, associate clinical professor at the Semel Institute, was interviewed and demonstrated memory techniques. (21 Sep 11) http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/health/your_health&id=8363333

Technology altering daily brain activity?

A Sept. 15 KABC-Channel 7 story explored the impact of technologies such as smart phones and the Internet on the brain. Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, was interviewed along with executive assistant Abigail Navarro. (15 Sep 11) http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/health/your_health&id=8355996

'Brain Fitness' Program Improves Memory

A Sept. 1 Medscape article reported on a UCLA study that found a memory fitness program offered to adults in their senior living communities helped improve their ability to recognize and recall words, boosting their verbal learning and retention. Study senior author Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, director of the UCLA Longevity Center and a professor at the Semel Institute and study author Dr. Karen Miller, associate clinical professor at the Semel Institute, were quoted. (1 Sep 11) http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749031

Memory fitness program helps improve ability to recognize and recall words

A Sept. 1 Medscape article reported on a UCLA study that found a memory fitness program offered to adults in their senior living communities helped improve their ability to recognize and recall words, boosting their verbal learning and retention. Study senior author Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, director of the UCLA Longevity Center and a professor at the Semel Institute and study author Dr. Karen Miller, associate clinical professor at the Semel Institute, were quoted. (1 Sep 11) http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749031

UCLA memory fitness program improves memory abilities of oldest adults

Who hasn't forgotten someone's name, misplaced their glasses or walked into a room and not remembered why they entered? Normal age-related memory decline affects more than half of all seniors, and those over 80 are the most vulnerable.   A new UCLA study has found that a memory fitness program offered to older adults in their senior living communities helped improve their ability to recognize and recall words, benefitting their verbal learning and retention. (29 Aug 11)

Where We Live: The Media Fast

National Public Radio-affiliate WNPR (Conn) reported Aug. 5 on technology’s impact on the brain and interviewed Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and director of the UCLA Longevity Center. He was also cited Aug. 10 in a related story by the news blog Mashable. (5 Aug 11) http://www.yourpublicmedia.org/content/wnpr/where-we-live-media-fast

Brain-injured veterans twice as likely to get dementia

MSNBC.com reported July 18 about research linking head injuries and dementia among U.S. military personnel and professional football players. The story cited brain-imaging research conducted by Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Longevity Center. Small was quoted. (18 Jul 11) http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/43797462/ns/health-alzheimers_disease/

The Web Is Your New Memory

Spectrum Magazine reported July 14 about how the use of new technologies affects memory.  Dr. Gary Small, Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, was interviewed.  The story was also picked up by Discovery News. (14 Jul 11) http://spectrum.ieee.org/telecom/internet/the-web-is-your-new-memory