UCLA Longevity Center News Archive


UCLA program helps slow the mind’s aging, one exercise at a time

By Anna Gorman, Published: March 4 E-mail the writer Just as they had so many times during the past 60 years, Marianna and Albert Frankel stepped onto the dance floor. He took her hand in his and smiling, waltzed her around the room. (5 Mar 14)

Doctor: Keeping the brain healthy is as important as exercising the body

As the body ages, so, too, does the brain, and to help avoid developing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of memory loss, the brain must be treated to mental and physical exercises, a healthy diet and visits to the doctor, when necessary. Dr. Gary Small, a medical doctor, professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, spoke to a crowd of mainly those over 60 during a Town Hall South lecture Tuesday in the auditorium of Upper St. Clair High School. When asked if audience members often forget names or objects like keys, almost every hand went up. (5 Feb 14)

New brain-imaging techniques have provided insights into the biological underpinnings of psychiatric illnesses

Dr. Gary Small, UCLA's Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging and a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, was quoted Dec. 27 in a Psychiatric News article on how new brain-imaging techniques have provided insights into the biological underpinnings of psychiatric illnesses. (15 Jan 14)

Adjusting financial planning to accommodate increased life expectancy.

Dr. Gary Small, UCLA's Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging and a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, was quoted Nov. 22 in a MarketWatch article about adjusting financial planning to accommodate increased life expectancy. (3 Dec 13)

Reduce Stress with Yoga

A Nov. 22 Bloomberg article about the benefits of yoga for relieving stress cited a study led by Dr. Helen Lavretsky, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, showing that using yoga to engage in brief daily meditation can lead to improved cognitive functioning and lower levels of depression. (3 Dec 13)